Home Fitness Top 10 Cable Arm Workouts for Bigger and Stronger Arms

Top 10 Cable Arm Workouts for Bigger and Stronger Arms

by Shah Nawaz
Cable Arm Workouts

Introduction

Cable arm workouts can help you build bigger and stronger arms. Cable machines provide the opportunity to perform exercises targeting different muscle groups in your arms – including your biceps, triceps, and forearms. Cable arm workouts are effective because they provide constant tension on muscles throughout entire range of motion, which leads more muscle damage and growth. In addition, cable arm workouts are versatile and can be adjusted suit your fitness level and goals.

What Are Cable Arm Workouts?

Cable arm workouts are exercises that use a cable machine target muscles of arms, especially biceps and triceps. Cable arm workouts have advantages over free weights, such as providing constant tension, allowing different angles, and mimicking muscle fiber direction. Some examples of cable arm exercises are cable curls, pushdowns, overhead cable curls, and Bayesian curls. These exercises can help you build bigger, stronger, and more defined arms.

Benefits of Cable Arm Workouts

Cable arm workouts are a great way strengthen and tone your upper body muscles. Cable machines allow you to perform various exercises with different angles and resistance levels, which can target different parts of your arms. Some of benefits of cable arm workouts are:

  • Constant tension throughout range of motion stimulates more muscle growth
  • Ability to work both arms or one arm at a time, which allows for more variety and symmetry
  • Ability to perform dozens of exercises with one piece of equipment, which saves time and space
  • Ability to adjust weight easily and quickly, which enables drop sets or supersets
  • Safer than free weights, which reduces risk of injury

10 Cable Arm Workouts

Cable rope curls

Cable rope curls

This exercise works biceps and brachialis, a muscle that lies beneath biceps and helps flex elbow. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a rope attachment a low pulley. 
  • Place your back on the machine, with your feet spread shoulder-width apart. 
  • Grab rope with both hands and keep your elbows close your sides. 
  • Curl rope up your chest, squeezing your biceps at top. 
  • Slowly lower rope back starting position.

Cable tricep extensions 

Cable triceps extensions

This exercise works triceps, muscles at back of your upper arms that help extend elbow. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a rope attachment a high pulley.
  • Stand facing away from machine with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Grab rope with both hands behind your head and keep your elbows bent at 90 degrees.
  • Extend your arms forward, pushing rope down until your arms are fully straightened.
  • Squeeze your triceps at bottom and then return starting position.

Single-arm cable curls

Single-arm cable curls

This exercise works one arm at a time, which allows you focus on each side separately and correct any imbalances. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a single handle attachment a low pulley. 
  • Stand facing machine with your feet shoulder-width apart. 
  • Grab handle with one hand and keep your elbow close your side. 
  • Curl handle up your shoulder, squeezing your bicep at top. 
  • Slowly lower handle back starting position. 
  • Repeat with other arm.

Single-arm cable tricep kickbacks

Single-arm cable tricep kickbacks

This exercise works one arm at a time, isolating each tricep and increasing its activation. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a single handle attachment a low pulley.
  • Stand facing away from machine with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Bend forward at hips and keep your back straight.
  • Grab handle with one hand and bring it up your side, keeping your elbow bent at 90 degrees.
  • Extend your arm back, kicking handle behind you until your arm is fully straightened.
  • Squeeze your tricep at end and then return starting position.
  • Repeat with other arm.

Straight bar tricep pushdowns

Straight bar tricep pushdowns

This exercise works all three heads of triceps, which gives them a more balanced and defined look. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a straight bar attachment a high pulley.
  • Stand facing machine with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Grab bar with both hands and keep your elbows close your sides.
  • Push bar down until your arms are fully straightened.
  • Squeeze your triceps at bottom and then return starting position.

Overhead cable curls

Overhead cable curls

This exercise works long head of biceps, which is responsible for giving them a peak shape. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a single handle attachment a high pulley on each side of machine. 
  • Steady yourself between them with feet shoulder-width apart. 
  • Hold both handles with one hand and bring them over your head while keeping elbows slightly bent.
  • Curl both handles down your ears, squeezing your biceps at bottom. 
  • Slowly raise both handles back starting position.

Supine cable curls

Supine cable curls

This exercise works biceps from a different angle, which helps stimulate new growth and development. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a straight bar and a low pulley on one side of the machine. 
  • Lie on a bench or floor facing up with your feet close machine. 
  • Grab bar with both hands and extend your arms over your chest, keeping your elbows slightly bent. 
  • Curl bar down your forehead, squeezing your biceps at bottom. 
  • Slowly raise bar back starting position.

Supine tricep extensions

This exercise works triceps from a different angle, which helps target lateral head and give it a more defined look. To do this exercise:

  • Attach a straight bar and a low pulley on one side of the machine.
  • Lie on a bench or floor facing up with your feet close machine.
  • Grab bar with both hands and extend your arms over your chest, keeping your elbows slightly bent.
  • Lower bar down your forehead, keeping your elbows in place.
  • Extend your arms back starting position, squeezing your triceps at top.

Single-arm cable preacher curls

Single-arm cable preacher curls

This exercise works biceps with more intensity and isolation, preventing any cheating or momentum from other arm or body. To do this exercise: 

  • Attach a single handle attachment a low pulley on one side of machine. 
  • Place a preacher bench in front of machine and adjust it a comfortable height. 
  • Sit on a bench and rest your upper arm on a pad. 
  • Grab handle with one hand and keep your elbow slightly bent. 
  • Curl handle up your shoulder, squeezing your bicep at top. 
  • Slowly lower handle back starting position. 
  • Repeat with other arm.

Cable hammer curls

Cable hammer curls

This exercise works brachioradialis, a muscle that runs outside your forearm and helps flex your elbow. To do this exercise: 

  • Attach a rope attachment a low pulley. 
  • Stand facing machine with your feet shoulder-width apart. 
  • Grab rope with both hands and keep your elbows close your sides. 
  • Curl rope up your chest, keeping your palms facing each other. 
  • Squeeze your forearms at top and then lower rope back starting position.

How to do each exercise

Here are some general guidelines for performing each exercise correctly and safely:

  • Start slowly and increase the weight as you gain strength and become more comfortable with movement.
  • Perform 3 sets of 8-12 reps of each exercise, resting for 60-90 seconds between sets.
  • Keep your core tight and your back straight throughout each exercise.
  • Breathe out as you lift or curl weight and breathe in as you lower or extend it.
  • Control weight on both movement phases, avoiding any jerky or fast motions.
  • Stop if you feel any pain or discomfort in your joints or muscles.

Tips for getting most out of your cable arm workouts

Here are some tips for maximizing your results and preventing injuries from your cable arm workouts:

  • Warm up before each workout by doing light cardio and dynamic stretches for your arms and shoulders.
  • Use a challenging weight that allows you to maintain good form and complete all reps and sets.
  • Focus on muscle contraction rather than on how much weight you are lifting.
  • Be bold and ask for help from a trainer or experienced lifter if you are unsure how to exercise or need a spotter.
  • Vary your exercises, weights, reps, and sets every few weeks avoid plateaus and boredom.
  • Make sure your diet includes adequate proteins, carbohydrates, and healthy fats to foster muscle growth and recovery. 
  • Stay hydrated by drinking lots of water before, during, and after workouts to stay hydrated and prevent cramps.
  • Resting your arms for at least 48 hours between workouts so they can heal properly.

Conclusion

A cable arm workout is a great way build strength and definition in your arms. Cable exercises are effective and versatile, and they can help you improve your overall arm development. Try this workout once or twice a week, and enjoy results.

FAQ

What are benefits of doing cable arm workouts?

Cable arm workouts can help build both strength and muscle in your arms, as well as improve range of motion and flexibility. Additionally, cable arm workouts can help reduce risk of injuries.

How often should I do cable arm workouts?

It is generally recommended do cable arm workouts 2-3 times per week. However, frequency of your workouts will depend on your individual goals and fitness level.

How long should each cable arm workout last?

Each cable arm workout should last for about 30-60 minutes. This time should include warm-up, workout itself, and cool-down.

What kind of weight should I use for cable arm workouts?

The weight you use for cable arm workouts will depend on your strength and fitness level. Start with a weight that is challenging but allows you maintain good form. As your strength improves, gradually increase the weight you carry.

What are some common mistakes avoid when doing cable arm workouts?

Some common mistakes avoid when doing cable arm workouts include:
Using too much weight
Not using proper form
Not warming up before your workout
Not cooling down after your workout
Overtraining

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