Home Health What are Dementia risk factors? Types, Causes, and symptoms

What are Dementia risk factors? Types, Causes, and symptoms

by Shah Nawaz
While thinking, memory, and thinking abilities are lost to where they slow down everyday undertakings, this condition is known as dementia. Some dementia risk factors patients have emotional instability and personality changes. There is a chance that around 50% of those 85 and over suffer from dementia. The current medications can help slow the decline of mental health.

While thinking, memory, and thinking abilities are lost to where they slow down everyday undertakings, this condition is known as dementia. Some dementia risk factors patients have emotional instability and personality changes. There is a chance that around 50% of those 85 and over suffer from dementia. The current medications can help slow the decline of mental health.

What is Dementia?

Dementia is not caused simply by age; rather it’s caused by various diseases or conditions that damage brain. Alzheimer’s complaint is the leading cause, though other forms similar to vascular dementia, Lewy body dementia, and frontotemporal madness also live. 

Dementia Risk Factors

Some of the dementia risk factors are given below:

  • Age: Dementia risk increases with age; most individuals living with dementia are 65 or older.
  • Family history: Your risk of dementia increases dramatically if a family member already suffers from it.
  • Head injuries: People who experience severe or repeated head injuries are at an increased risk of dementia. Brain injuries could initiate processes that will eventually lead to dementia.
  • Down syndrome: People with Down syndrome have an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease by middle age.
  • Vascular dementia: Vascular dementia is brought about by harm to veins in the mind, frequently because of cardiovascular circumstances like hypertension, stroke, or coronary ailment.
  • Other medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, including diabetes, thyroid issues, and Parkinson’s disease can increase your risk of dementia.
  • Lifestyle factors: Smoking use, excessive alcohol consumption, and leading an inactive lifestyle all increase risk of dementia.

Types of Dementia Risk Factors

There are multiple types of dementia risk factors, Here are the different types given below:

Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer's is a progressive neurodegenerative disease responsible for 60-80% of dementia cases and can be identified by amyloid plaques and tau tangles buildup in the brain.

Alzheimer’s is a progressive neurodegenerative disease responsible for 60-80% of dementia cases and can be identified by amyloid plaques and tau tangles buildup in the brain.

Vascular Dementia

Second most typical form of dementia is vascular dementia. It is brought on by harm to the brain’s blood arteries, which can limit blood flow there and kill nerve cells.

Lewy body Dementia

Lewy body dementia is a form of dementia that manifests with memory loss, hallucinations, and movement issues.

Frontotemporal Dementia

Frontotemporal dementia is a type of dementia that influences the front-facing and fleeting curves of the mind, regions that control character, conduct, language abilities, and critical thinking skills.

Mixed Dementia

Mixed dementia refers to dementia that encompasses two or more forms.

What can Cause Dementia?

Dementia is caused by harm to or loss of nerve cells and their connections in the mind.

There are several causes, including:

Diseases

Alzheimer’s, vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and frontotemporal dementia are the four most often happening reasons for dementia. Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob may likewise add to its beginning.

abusing drugs

Abuse of drugs and excessive drinking can harm the brain and cause dementia.

Stages of Dementia Risk factors

Dementia typically progresses slowly through three stages, known as early, middle, and late (also sometimes known in medical jargon as mild, moderate, and severe). Individuals affected by dementia will likely experience its symptoms differently and progress through each of its three stages differently.

Early stage Dementia

In the early stage of dementia, a person may have:

  • Mild memory loss, such as forgetting recent events or conversations
  • Difficult to find the right words
  • Trouble with complex tasks, such as cooking or managing finances
  • Changes in personality or mood

At this stage, someone living with dementia can still remain independent but may require assistance for daily tasks and activities of daily living.

Middle stage Dementia

In the middle stage of dementia, a person may have:

  • Memory impairment may also include more serious symptoms, such as forgetting the names of close associates or family members.
  • Difficulty communicating and understanding others
  • Trouble performing daily living activities like dressing, bathing, and eating
  • Changes in character and conduct, including expanded disturbance, animosity, or meandering can happen after some time.

At this stage, those living with dementia might need extra help from parental figures or even need to move to a helped living office.

Late stage Dementia

In the late stage of dementia, a person may have:

  • Severe memory loss, such as forgetting their own identity
  • Difficulty communicating
  • Total dependence on others for care
  • Changes in character and conduct, for example, becoming removed or forceful

At this stage, a person suffering from dementia will likely require 24-hour care in a nursing home or other long-term care facility.

Dementia Symptoms

Symptoms of dementia vary depending on its cause and stage of progression; however, here are some commonly observed indicators:

Memory loss

Difficulty remembering recent events, people, places, or things.

Confusion

Difficulty understanding or following instructions or conversations.

Difficulty thinking and solving problems

Difficulty making decisions, planning, or following through on tasks can make it challenging to manage daily life. 

Language problems

Difficulty speaking, understanding, or writing.

Behavioural changes

Personality changes include becoming more withdrawn, irritable, or aggressive.

If you suspect dementia may affect you or a loved one, consulting a physician immediately is essential to improving quality of life and slowing the disease’s progress. Early diagnosis and treatment can significantly enhance the quality of life while slowing progression.

How to Reduce Your Dementia Risk Factors

There is no guarantee of dementia counteraction. However, there are steps you can take to bring down your gamble:

  • Maintaining a healthy lifestyle: Consuming a nutritious eating routine, taking part in actual exercise consistently, and getting sufficient rest are completely demonstrated systems for lessening dementia risk.
  • Managing chronic health conditions: Assuming you experience the ill effects of constant ailments like hypertension, diabetes, or elevated cholesterol levels. It is essentially critical that they are properly made due.
  • Staying mentally active: Engaging in mentally stimulating activities such as reading, playing games or learning new skills can help to keep your mind sharp.
  • Socializing: Social interactions are essential to brain health. Make time for friends and family as well as join social activities.

If you have any problem with dementia, consult with a doctor. He or she can develop a plan to lower risk and protect brain health.

Conclusion

Dementia risk factors can have devastating repercussions for those affected and their loved ones, yet there are measures you can take to decrease your risk or manage its symptoms if an official diagnosis comes your way.

Whenever you have concerns about dementia risk factors, talk to your physician. He or she can assess it and suggest ways of mitigating it. Additionally, if diagnosed, speak to them about treatment options and support resources available to you.

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